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Plead the Belly

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028 -PTB discusses Cassie Chadwick, Amelia's alternate career plans and how great our state is

028 -PTB discusses Cassie Chadwick, Amelia's alternate career plans and how great our state is

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Cassie Chadwick as born as  Elizabeth Bigley in Eastwood, Ontario, Canada in 1857. 

When she was 14 years old she moved to Woodstock, Ontario, where she opened a bank account using a suspicious letter from a fake uncle.  With the account she managed to pass dozens of worthless checks around the city. In 1870 the police discovered her scheme and arrested her for forgery. She escaped because she was a minor and people thought she was mentally ill. 

After this Chadwick moved to the Cleveland to live with her sister. She married Dr. Wallace but the marriage ended after 11 days when he discovered her background. They were divorced in 1883 after he paid her debts. 

Chadwick became a fortune teller known as Lydia Scott and then as Madame Lydia DeVere. She opened a small shop and funded it by pawning her sister furniture. 

She married again, this time to John R. Scott, a farmer in Ohio. This marriage was also short lived and she sued him for adultery. 

In 1897 she married Dr. Leroy Chadwick. She introduced herself as Mrs. Hoover and claimed she ran a boarding house

Her husband was well respected in the community and lived on a street known as Millionaires Row

From 1897- 1905 Chadwick began to borrow large amounts of money from local banks by claiming to be the heir of Andrew Carnegie. She convinced people of this by first going to Carnegie’s house with a lawyer and pretending to speak with him. Then she dropped a fake promissory note in from of the lawyer that had Carnegie’s signature. 

From here she managed to convince other banks to loan her money, including the Oberlin bank. She would convince people that she was related to Andrew Carnegie by inviting them over and showing them a picture of a man hung on her wall.  She would then explained that the man was her uncle who used to supply her family with money and on his deathbed told her that she was related to Andrew Carnegie. She claimed there was proof in a safety deposit box in New York but would never reveal the name of the bank. 

She also claimed that there was $7 million in promissory notes tucked away in her Cleveland home, and she was to inherit $400 million upon Carnegie's death. She said that she could contact Baldwin, a man who worked at the bank, to get the money. He was completely made up. 

Eventually people caught on and the bankers took her to New York. She then told them that she left the papers back in Ohio. 

They followed her back home where she tried to avoid them for several days, until they insisted on seeing her. 

She accumulated over $1 million in debts, and was exposed on November 2, 1904 when one of the bankers  brought suit to recover $190,800. She fled to New York but was brought back to stand trail. On March 10, 1905 she was found guilty of 7 counts of conspiracy against the government and conspiracy to wreck the Citizens Natl. Bank of Oberlin. Chadwick was sentenced to 14 years in prison and fined $70,000. Chadwick was jailed on January 12, 1906, and died a year later




029 - PTB discusses Loretta Valezquez, Spy v. Spy and Mulan

029 - PTB discusses Loretta Valezquez, Spy v. Spy and Mulan

027 - PTB discusses Lizzie Borden, old timey murders, and  mother goose

027 - PTB discusses Lizzie Borden, old timey murders, and mother goose